Piping – Do I Need a Registration?

PVE-3483 LRB / RDS / BEM, Last updated Aug 26 2016

Updates

July 2016: Piping requirements are constantly changing in Canada.  Please check the “Last updated” date for each province to determine how current it is.  We do our best to keep this page up to date, but please check with your destination jurisdiction for the latest requirements. 

Introduction:

The Canadian B51 standard covers the need to register Pressure Vessels, Boilers and Piping. Of the three, piping is by far the hardest to register.

The first problem is that the B51 standard provides the need to register piping systems, but does not define what a piping system is and when it needs registration. In absence of clarity in the covering standard, each province has a different guideline on what must be registered.

Registration of Piping:

Registration of piping is done to an address of installation. For a manufacturer of identical piping systems, each different address of installation must be registered. This can be avoided in cases where piping systems can be registered as fittings – typically smaller systems with less than 1.5 cuft volume. Update: Ontario has a category of standard piping systems which eliminates the need to register identical piping systems many times for different installation addresses. This standard category is also used for portable systems.

A piping system is made up of a collection of registered fittings (valves, elbows, flanges, hoses, and strainers etc.) and calculated components like pipe and nozzles. It is easiest to find registered fittings for common service like compressed air or steam. Be careful with expiry dates of fittings. Try not to use items that will expire within a year of your submission date – piping registrations can take a long time, requiring re-design if components expire during the process.

The easiest way to deal with fittings lacking CRNs that cannot be substituted is to get the manufacturer to get them registered. Some reviewers will allow you to burst test unregistered components as an alternative to registration.

The ACI web site (www.acicrn.com) contains a list of vessels and fittings registered in Atlantic Canada and the Territories. Many of the listed fittings are also registered in other Canadian provinces.

In all provinces except for Quebec, piping registration is done in advance of construction and is handled just like a pressure vessel. You need calculations, drawings and an appropriate QC program. In Quebec the piping design documents are reviewed on site by the Authorized Inspector before turning the system on.

Most provinces need piping systems to be signed off by a P.Eng. This is more restrictive than pressure vessels, but comes from the piping codes – see B31.3 301.1(b) “Qualifications of the designer”.

Customers are often surprised at the number of pressure relief devices required on a registered piping system.

Common definitions:

Expansible fluid: expansible fluid means any vapour or gaseous substance, or any liquid under a pressure and at a temperature that is such that the liquid will change – “flash” – to a gas or vapour when the pressure is reduced to atmospheric conditions (70°F, 15 psia).

15 psi exemption: many provinces do not specifically state that piping must be over 15 psi to require registration. This is taken from the B51 standard Figures 1(a), 1(b) and 1(c) which only covers items over 15psi. Some provinces require steam piping at any pressure to be registered.

Canada Wide Requirements

Refrigeration – Canada Wide

Each province has its own refrigeration requirements. The differences between provinces are large. Be especially careful interpreting exemptions. PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Refrigeration – Canada Wide

Apr 21 2015 by Ray Stroud, PVE-8986

Introduction

As is common with other areas of Canadian pressure regulations, each province has its own refrigeration requirements. The differences between provinces are large, so do not use previous experience from one province as a guide to new projects in another. Be especially careful interpreting exemptions. An exemption from registration can still require you to meet ASME B31 codes, use registered components and get Authorized Inspector sign-off. An exemption to an act removes all of these requirements.

As an example of the differences between an exemption to registration, and an exemption to an act consider the exemption to registration of piping 3″ or less in B.C.: (from Pressure Piping Registration and Inspection)

3. The standards governing the design and construction of all pressure piping systems including piping that is NPS 3 or less are the ASME Code for Pressure Piping, B31 series. The design of pressure piping that is NPS 3 or less does not require registration however the piping system must comply with all other requirements of the Regulation and construction code.

This is an example of an exemption to registration, not the removal of the need to follow all other provincial rules. If in doubt about the need to follow provincial acts, or to register your refrigeration system, ask the jurisdiction for an answer in writing. If you get an exemption, keep the answer on permanent file to avoid future confusion. And finally, check with your customer to determine if they have CRN requirements even if the destination province does not.

British Columbia

Per the B.C. Refrigeration Installation Permit Application The requirement to register refrigeration piping, and the need to follow all other B.C. code rules varies by size of the plant and the refrigerant used:

1. Definition of refrigeration equipment: [Means] machinery in which refrigerants are capable of being compressed, liquefied and vaporized.

2. Installation permit is required for any refrigeration plant having more than 5 kW nameplate rating.

Piping design registration is required for the following:

a) 125 kW or more for Group A1, A2 or B1 Refrigerants or;

b) 25 kW or more for all other Refrigerant Groups.

With piping system more than 3 NPS in diameter.

All pressure vessels shall have BC design registration number (CRN) and shall have a British Columbia Identification Number assigned to them by a Safety Officer of the BC Safety Authority.

Inspection is per chart on page 2 of the form. This is an exemption from registration, not an exemption from the act.

Alberta

Per the Alberta Pressure Equipment Exemption Order refrigeration equipment not exceeding 10.5kW is exempt:

(2) The Pressure Equipment Safety Regulation, the Pressure Welders Regulation and the Power Engineers Regulation do not apply to the following:

(r) a pressure piping system and the machinery and equipment ancillary to the pressure piping system, if the machinery and equipment

(i) vaporize, compress and liquefy refrigerants in the refrigerating cycle, and

(ii) have a refrigerating capacity not exceeding 10.5 kilowatts;

This is an exemption to the act.

Saskatchewan

Per the Saskatchewan The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, 1999 refrigeration equipment not exceeding 10.5kW is exempt (10.55 kW = 3 Tons refrigeration / day)

3(1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), this Act applies to all boilers, pressure vessels, plants, pressure piping systems and fittings except:

(o) a refrigeration plant that has a capacity of three tonnes or less of refrigeration in 24 hours;

This is an exemption to the act.

Manitoba

Per the scope of the Manitoba Steam and Pressure Plants Act Refrigeration plant requirements vary by construction method and refrigerant (100 tons is 351.7 kW and 50 tons is 175.9 kW).

Factory-assembled refrigeration units that generate less than 100 tons of refrigerating capacity and site-assembled refrigeration units that generate less than 50 tons of refrigerating capacity are exempt, unless the refrigerant is ammonia.

This is an exemption to the act.

Ontario

Refrigeration Systems Rated 125 kW or Less

Paragraph 5.2 of the CSA-B52-05 (R2009) Including B52S1-09 states the various standards that are acceptable for use in Ontario refrigeration piping without requiring CRN registration. Items rated 125kW or less do not need a CRN if the system is built and certified to one of the following standards:

  • CSA C22.2 No. 63; (Household refrigerators or freezers)
  • CSA C22.2 No. 92; (Dehumidifiers)
  • CSA C22.2 No. 117; (Room air conditioners)
  • CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 120; (Refrigeration equipment)
  • CSA C22.2 No. 128; (Vending machine)
  • CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 236; (Heating and cooling equipment)

For other items, the exemption is 3 Ton (11 kW) per the Ontario Technical Standards and Safety Act, 2000 a refrigeration piping for system > 3 Tons (11 kW) capacity needs to be registered.

2. (1) This Regulation applies to the design, construction, maintenance, use, operation, repair and service of boilers, pressure vessels and piping. O. Reg. 220/01, s. 2 (1).

(2) This Regulation does not apply to,

(i) a refrigeration piping that has a capacity of three tons (11 kW) or less of refrigeration;

This is an exemption to the act.

Quebec

Per the Quebec Regulation respecting pressure vessels, piping in air conditioning systems less than 20 kW does not require registration.

3 Sections 14, 16 and 18 of the Act do not apply to the installation of the following vessels nor to an addition to or modification of their piping:

(4) the components of a refrigeration plant whose total compressor motor power is 20 kW or less.

This is an exemption to the act.

New Brunswick

The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, NB Reg 84-174 does not provide exemptions for refrigeration systems. Contact ACI or N.B. for guidance on your project.

Nova Scotia

Per the Boiler and Pressure Equipment Regulations made under Section 49 of the Technical Safety Act refrigeration plants under 11kW do not need registration.

Products exempted from Act and regulations 4 (1) All of the following products are exempt under subsection 6(2) of the Act from the Act and these regulations:

(h) a refrigeration plant that has a common, connected refrigerant with a maximum output capacity within a 24-hour period of 11 kW (3 tons) or less;

This is an exemption to the act.

Prince Edward Island

According to the Chapter B-5 Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act Regulations refrigeration plants less than 60kW do not need to be registered, but the piping shall follow all requirements of the regulations:

5.17 The following piping shall be considered pressure piping subject to all the requirements of these regulations:
(c) piping to carry refrigerants, anhydrous ammonia, propane and similar gases;

Designs Not Required to be Registered

5.30 The following pressure plant designs are not required to be submitted for registration unless required by the Chief Inspector but shall otherwise comply with the regulations:

(c) refrigeration plants that do not exceed 60 kW;

This is an exemption from registration, not an exemption from the act.

Newfoundland

Per the Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Compressed Gas Regulations under the Public Safety Act. Refrigeration systems 10.5kW or less are exempt:

3. (1) These regulations apply to all steam and hot water boilers, pressure vessels, heat exchangers, air receivers, pressure plants, pressure piping systems, compressed gas systems and other pressure vessels or fittings referred to in the Act or defined in these regulations and to all power engineers, refrigeration and compressor operators, pressure welders, gas personnel and medical gas installers.

(2) Subject to subsection (3), these regulations do not apply to

(k) a refrigerating system that has a motive rating of 10.5 kilowatts or less.

[subsection 3 is referenced form subsection 2, but does not apply to refrigeration systems, it is included here for completeness} (3) Pressure vessels of 50 litres or less in capacity in the following categories are subject to all requirements of the Act and regulations:

(a) steam jacketed sterilizers;

(b) autoclaves; and

(c) steam jacketed kettles.

This is an exemption to the act for small refrigeration systems. Larger plants can be exempt from registration, but are subject to the act:

Calculation of kilowatt rating: 13. The total kilowatt rating of a registered
(c) refrigeration plant is the sum of the kilowatt rating of the refrigeration systems when the sum exceeds 75 kilowatts or 450 kilowatts when a plant uses only Group A1 refrigerants;

Yukon

According to the Boiler and Pressure Vessels Act of Yukon, any refrigeration system less than or equal to 10.5 kW is exempt:

(2) This Act or any regulation made under this Act does not apply to:
h) any pressure piping system and machinery and equipment ancillary thereto by which refrigerants are vaporized, compressed and liquefied in the refrigerating cycle and that has a capacity of 10.5 kilowatts or less;

This is an exemption to the act.

Nunavut

Refer to Ontario.

Note: The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act is in the process of being repealed and replaced by the Technical Standards & Safety Act.

North West Territories

Per the Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act R.S.N.W.T. 1988,c.B-2 Refrigeration plants less than or equal to 11kW are exempt from registration:

2. (1) This Act does not apply to

(d) a refrigeration plant having a capacity of 11 kW or less of refrigeration in 24 hours.

This is an exemption to the act.


Hydraulic Systems – Canada Wide

Hydraulic systems include high pressure piping which rarely requires registration. Individual provinces with specific requirements or exemptions are discussed. PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Hydraulic Systems – Canada Wide

Hydraulic systems include high pressure piping which rarely requires registration – for example high temperature hydraulic piping in Ontario requires registration (for example high temperature lube and lift oil on gas turbines).   Refer to the piping charts for each province.

Regardless of the need for piping to be registered, hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders connected to the piping systems are not covered by ASME code rules and most provinces specifically exempt them.  Here are some of the exemptions for hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders connected to piping systems:

British Columbia

Power Engineers, Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Refrigeration Safety Regulation B.C. Reg. 104/2004

3  (1) This regulation applies in respect of every boiler and boiler plant, every pressure plant, every pressure vessel, every pressure piping system, every fitting, every plant and all refrigeration equipment and refrigeration plants.

(2) Despite subsection (1), this regulation does not apply to any of the following:

(i) a pressure vessel used for hydraulic purposes having an operating temperature of less than 82°C [180°F] , if the primary design considerations are mechanical in nature and stresses are derived from the functional requirements of the device rather than fluid pressure;

Alberta

Pressure Equipment Exemption Order – Alberta Regulation 56/2006 With amendments up to and including Alberta Regulation 158/2014

(2)  The Pressure Equipment Safety Regulation, the Pressure Welders Regulation and the Power Engineers Regulation do not apply to the following:

(j) a pressure container that is an integral part of a rotating or reciprocating mechanical device, such as a pump, compressor, turbine, generator, engine or hydraulic or pneumatic actuating cylinder, where the primary design considerations or stresses of the device are derived from the functional requirements of the device;

Saskatchewan

The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, 1999, Chapter B-5.1 of the Statutes of Saskatchewan

Application of Act 3(1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), this Act applies to all boilers, pressure vessels, plants, pressure piping systems and fittings except:

(m) a pressure vessel that is used exclusively for hydraulic purposes at atmospheric temperature;

Ontario

Ontario Regulation 220/01 No Amendments Boilers and Pressure Vessels:

Application 2. (1) This Regulation applies to the design, construction, maintenance, use, operation, repair and service of boilers, pressure vessels and piping. O. Reg. 220/01, s. 2 (1).

(2) This Regulation does not apply to,

(m) pressure containers that form an integral part of or that are a component of rotating or reciprocating mechanical devices, including pumps, compressors, turbines, generators, engines and hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders where the primary design considerations or stresses, or both, are derived from the functional requirements of the device;

Nova Scotia

Boiler and Pressure Equipment Regulations made under Section 49 of the Technical Safety Act S.N.S. 2008, c. 10 O.I.C. 2011-27 (January 18, 2011, effective April 1, 2011), N.S. Reg. 10/2011:

4 (1) All of the following products are exempt under subsection 6(2) of the Act from the Act and these regulations:

(l) a pressure vessel that is an integral part of a rotating or reciprocating mechanical device, such as a pump, compressor, turbine, generator, engine and hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, and the primary design considerations or stresses of which are derived from the functional requirements of the device;

Province by Province Piping Requirements

Piping – British Columbia

Piping Requirements for British Columbia PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – British Columbia

Last updated Apr 25 2014 LRB

This flowchart is an approximate combination of information collected from the following source: “Pressure Piping Registration”2012

1. This circular details the requirements for the registration of designs, installation and inspection of pressure piping systems for use in British Columbia. Pressure piping systems are piping systems containing (a) an expansible fluid, or (b) a non-expansible fluid or thermal fluid (fluids other than water or aqueous solutions used for heat transfer) with an operating temperature exceeding 121oC or a working pressure exceeding 1100 kPa. An expansible fluid is any vapour, gas or liquid that will change to a vapour or gas at atmospheric conditions (14.7 psia and 70degF)…

2. The following pressure piping systems are exempted from the requirements of the Power Engineers, Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Refrigeration Safety Regulation: (a) A pressure piping system operating at and with a relief valve or valves set at 103kPa or less. (b) A pressure piping system external to the boiler proper in a low temperature low pressure fluid plant (a plant containing a liquid but not thermal fluids operating at a working pressure of 206 kPa or less and a temperature of 100degC or less).

3. The standards governing the design and construction of all pressure piping systems including piping that is NPS 3 or less are the ASME Code for Pressure Piping, B31 series. The design of pressure piping that is NPS 3 or less does not require registration however the piping system must comply with all other requirements of the Regulation and construction code [.]

Flowchart of Piping process in BC

Printable BC Chart


Piping – Alberta

Piping requirements for Alberta PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Alberta

Last updated Apr 25 2014 LRB
This flowchart is an approximate combination of information collected from the following sources: Safety Codes Act 49/2006,Safety Codes Act Flow Chart Effective April 1, 2006, not specifically referenced below, Pressure Equipment Exemption Order,Pressure Equipment Safety Regulation and Questions regarding piping systems less than 500 Litres and registration requirements

Safety Codes Act

Safety Codes Act 49/2006 Revised Statutes of Alberta 2000 Chapter S-1 Current as of December 10, 2012 [SCA]

1(1)(y) “pressure equipment” means a thermal liquid heating system and any containment for an expansible fluid under pressure, including, but not limited to, fittings, boilers, pressure vessels and pressure piping systems, as defined in the regulations;

1(1)(cc) “thermal liquid heating system” means one or more thermal liquid heaters in which a thermal liquid that is not pressurized by the application of a heat source is used as the heat transfer medium and includes any connected piping system or vessel;

Pressure Equipment Safety Regulation

Alberta Regulation 49/2006 With amendments up to and including Alberta Regulation 218/2013 [PESR]

Definitions for the PESR and PEEO:

1(l) “expansible fluid” means (i) a vapour or gaseous fluid, or (ii) a liquid under pressure and at a temperature at which the liquid changes to a gas or vapour when the pressure is reduced to atmospheric pressure or when the temperature is increased to ambient temperature;

1(n) “fitting” means a valve, gauge, regulating or controlling device, flange, pipe fitting or any other appurtenance that is attached to, or forms part of, a boiler, pressure vessel, fired-heater pressure coil, thermal liquid heating system or pressure piping system;

1(o) “heating plant” means (i) a boiler in which steam or other vapour can be generated at a pressure not exceeding 103 kilopascals and a temperature not exceeding 121 degrees Celsius, (ii) a boiler in which liquid can be heated to a pressure not exceeding 1100 kilopascals and a temperature not exceeding 121 degrees Celsius at or near the outlet of the boiler, or (iii) a system or arrangement of boilers described in subclause (i) or (ii), and the pressure vessels, pressure piping systems and fittings used in connection with one or more of the boilers;

1(y) “power plant” means (i) a boiler in which steam or other vapour can be generated at a pressure exceeding 103 kilopascals or a temperature exceeding 121 degrees Celsius, (ii) a boiler in which liquid can be heated to a pressure exceeding 1100 kilopascals or a temperature exceeding 121 degrees Celsius, or both, or (iii) a system or arrangement of boilers described in subclause (i) or (ii), and the pressure vessels, pressure piping systems and fittings used in connection with one or more of the boilers;

1(aa) “pressure piping system” means pipes, tubes, conduits, fittings, gaskets, bolting and other components that make up a system for the conveyance of an expansible fluid under pressure and may also control the flow of that fluid;

1(bb) “pressure plant” means a pressure vessel or a system or arrangement of pressure vessels and the pressure piping system used in connection with the pressure vessel or the system or arrangement of pressure vessels;

Exemptions:

3 This Regulation does not apply to the following: (a) gas piping that is used to convey gas exclusively for fuel purposes and that is subject to the Gas Code Regulation (AR 111/2010); (b) a piping system that is subject to the CSA Standard Z7396.1, Medical Gas Pipeline Systems – Part 1: Pipelines for Medical Gases and Vacuum; (c) a pressure piping system and the machinery and equipment ancillary to the pressure piping system, if the machinery and equipment (i) vaporize, compress and liquefy refrigerants in the refrigerating cycle, and (ii) have a refrigerating capacity not exceeding 10.5 kilowatts; (d) gas filled electrical switchgear or control gear.

4 Partial exemption: (1) In this section, “DN” means a dimensionless designator used in the SI (metric) system to describe pipe size. (2) Pressure piping (a) that does not exceed DN 50, (b) that has a maximum allowable working pressure not exceeding 1035 kilopascals, (c) that has a design temperature between minus 29 degrees Celsius and 186 degrees Celsius, (d) that contains air, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, steam or hot water, and (e) that is constructed to the applicable ASME Code, is exempt from all the other requirements of this Regulation except section 35.[Unsafe condition, accident or fire]

14 Pressure equipment design registration: (6) Despite subsections (1) and (2), the following are exempt from the requirement to have the design registered by the Administrator: (a) a pressure piping system having an aggregate internal volume not exceeding 500 litres; [Important note: the 0.5m^3 volume is the complete system volume, not the volume of one skid attached to the system!]

Pressure Equipment Exemption Order

Alberta Regulation 56/2006 [PEEO].

2(1) Exemptions: The Safety Codes Act and the Pressure Equipment Safety Regulation [PESR] do not apply to the following:

(e) a pipeline, as defined in the Pipeline Act, except for a boiler, pressure vessel, pressure plant, power plant or heating plant that forms the whole or any part of an installation, as defined in the Pipeline Act;

2(2) The Pressure Equipment Safety Regulation [PESR] does not apply to the following:

(d) a pressure vessel or pressure piping system that (i) is fully vented or operating with one or more pressure relief devices with set pressure not exceeding 103 kilopascals and sized so that the operating pressure cannot exceed 103 kilopascals, (ii) is not a blow-off vessel for a boiler that forms part of a power plant, and (iii) does not have a differential pressure on the pressure boundary exceeding 103 kilopascals;

(i) a pressure piping system that forms part of a heating plant;

(k) a pressure plant that has one or more pressure vessels and the total volume of all the vessels does not exceed 42.5 litres;

(n) pressure equipment, other than boilers, with a volume not exceeding 42.5 litres that (i) is the subject of a research experiment in a research facility, or (ii) is part of a temporary apparatus being used in a research experiment in a research facility;

(o) non-circulating thermal liquid heating systems.

Piping Systems Less Than 500 Litres

Questions regarding piping systems less than 500 Litres and registration requirements ABSA, retrieved Apr 2 2014.

One area of considerable confusion is the 500 litre exemption. This is an exemption from registration, not from following the Alberta rules. In theory, if two less than 500 litre skids were combined to create a larger piping system, all the documentation would be available to create a registered piping system if required. Reading this web page is recommended. Some simplifications of the answers given by ABSA: (1.1) The piping volume considered covers the expansible fluid only, do not include not expansible pipes. (1.2) The volume calculated does not include pressure vessels. (1.4 and 1.5) Addition of not exceeding 500 litres of new piping to an existing system registered or not does not require registration. (2.1) The 500 litre exemption does not exempt the use of registered components.

From an unknown source: if two small skids less than 500 litre registrable volume are combinded in a new plant, both skids would need registration as they are now part of a larger registrable piping system. It is the volume of the overall piping system that matters, not the individual skids. In theory this registration should not be difficult because the skids would be built completely to Alberta requirements with all the required paperwork and just need registering. It is not possible to avoid registration by breaking up a piping system into a series of smaller skids.

From our experience: the 500 litre exemption does not prohibit the registration of small piping system, it just makes it optional. Customers or engineering firms often require the registration regardless.

Additional Alberta Requirements

Our sample piping system at Overpressure Protection discusses piping PRV requirements unique to Alberta.

Flowchart of Piping process in Alberta


Piping – Saskatchewan

Piping requirements for Saskatchewan PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Saskatchewan

Last updated May 28, 2014 LRB

This flowchart is an approximate combination of information collected from the following sources: 1) The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, 1999 with 2006, 2010 and 2013 amendments. and Pressure Piping Design as discussed on the TSASK web site. The flow chart indicates which source provides which requirement. Where the requirement is listed in both the Act and the website, the Act reference is provided.

The Act

The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, 1999 amended

2(b) “boiler” means a vessel in which steam is or may be generated or hot water produced under pressure, and includes any high pressure boiler or low pressure boiler and any pipe, fitting, prime mover, machinery or other equipment attached to the vessel or used in connection with the vessel;

2(g) “expansible fluid” means: (i) any vapour or gas; or (ii) any liquid that will change to a vapour or gas at atmospheric conditions;

2(r) “pressure piping system” means pipes, tubes, conduits, gaskets, bolts and other fittings making up a system, the sole purpose of which is the conveyance of an expansible fluid under pressure and the control of the flow of an expansible fluid under pressure between two or more points;

From 3(1) – Exemptions: the following are exempt from registration in Saskatchewan:

(c) a pipeline as defined in The Pipelines Act, 1998;

(d) gas equipment or a gas installation as defined in The Gas Licensing Act;

(e) a boiler that is used in connection with a hot liquid heating system that has no valves or other obstructions to free circulation between the boiler and an expansion tank that is fully vented to the atmosphere;

(o) a refrigeration plant that has a capacity of three tonnes or less of refrigeration in 24 hours;

The Website

TSASK Website Pressure Piping Design page – Regulated Pressure Piping within Saskatchewan:

A pressure piping system is defined through The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act as pipes, tubes, conduits, gaskets, bolts and other fittings making up a system, the sole purpose of which is the conveyance of an expansible fluid under pressure and the control of the flow of an expansible fluid under pressure between two or more points. The Act and supporting Regulations further define pressure piping regulated within Saskatchewan through the following exemptions:

piping governed by The Pipelines Act, 1998 (such as CSA Z662 piping);

piping governed by The Gas Licensing Act (such as CSA B149.2 propane storage piping and CSA B149.1 combustion fuel piping);

medical gas piping systems

air piping with a diameter of 25.4 mm or less;

piping systems forming a part of a low pressure boiler plant and containing hot water at a pressure of 1103 kPa or less or a temperature of 121°C or less; and

piping systems that are not connected to, or used in connection with, a boiler or pressure vessel.

Flowchart of Piping process in Saskatchewan


Piping – Manitoba

Piping requirements for Manitoba PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Manitoba

Last updated May 3 2014 LRB

Information has been gathered from the following sources: Inspection and Technical Services Manitoba website, accessed May 3 2014 C.C.S.M. c. S210 The Steam and Pressure Plants Act July 6 2001, Responsibilities Manitoba Steam and Pressure Plants Act and Regulation Manitoba Power Engineers Act and Regulation, C.C.S.M. c. P95 The Power Engineers Act June 14, 2012, Flow Chart for Installation of Piping Systems,

From these sources it is not possible to create a consistent flowchart to determine whether a piping system needs registration or not. We recommend contacting the government of Manitoba to determine if your piping system needs registration, or if registration is not required but all other Manitoba requirements must be followed, or if your system is exempt from all requirements.

The Steam and Pressure Plants Act

C.C.S.M. c. S210 July 6, 2001, current as of May 1 2014

Definitions:

“plant” means a steam plant or a pressure plant;

“pressure plant” means an installation designed or used for utilizing or confining, under pressure, any liquid or gaseous substances other than steam, and includes the compressor thereof and all appurtenances connected therewith, but does not include (a) those that have a capacity of less than 1 1/2 cubic feet, and (b) those that are operated subject to a pressure less than 15 pounds to the square inch;

“refrigeration plant” means a pressure plant in which refrigerants are vaporized, compressed, and liquefied, in their refrigerating cycle, and includes the complete installation of machinery in connection therewith;

“steam plant” means an installation designed or used for generating, utilizing, confining, or storing, under pressure, steam or hot water, including the boiler thereof and all appurtenances and appliances connected therewith, but does not include (a) those that develop less than three horse power, (b) those that are used for heating a building designed and constructed as a private residence intended to house not more than one family, and (c) those that are used for heating a building used solely for residential purposes and containing not more than two separate apartments or suites;

This act does not provide a definition of piping.

The Power Engineers Act

C.C.S.M. c. P95 June 14, 2012

Definitions:

“plant” means a steam plant, pressure plant or refrigeration plant, or any combination thereof, and all appurtenances and appliances connected therewith;

“pressure plant” means an installation designed or used for utilizing or confining, under pressure, any liquid or gaseous substance other than steam, including the compressor thereof and all appurtenances connected therewith;

“refrigeration plant” means a pressure plant in which refrigerants are vaporized, compressed and liquefied in their refrigerating cycle, including the complete installation of machinery and all appurtenances connected therewith;

“steam plant” means an installation designed or used for generating, utilizing, confining or storing, under pressure, steam or liquid, including the boiler thereof and all appurtenances and appliances connected therewith.

Inspection and Technical Services Manitoba website

Website accessed May 3 2014

“What Designs Must Be Registered?” The two CSA standards, B51 and B52, contain administrative requirements for registering drawings, specifications and Data Reports with the jurisdictional authority. Manitoba has fully adopted the design registration requirements described by these codes for the following processes: … Registration of design for pressure piping of a volume 17 cubic feet and larger…

“General Requirements for Design and Fabrication of Pressure Piping Systems” All pressure piping systems for use in Manitoba shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the applicable ANSI/ASME Piping Codes and the Manitoba Labour and Immigration, Steam and Pressure Plants Act.

Flow Chart for Installation of Piping Systems

This Flow Chart is found on the Inspection and Technical Services Manitoba website:

Please note that although systems under 17 cuft are exempt from registration, they still have to be fully compliant with all other Manitoba requirements, including Authorized Inspector sign-off on Manitoba forms and the use of registered fittings. The Steam and Pressure Plants act suggests that some pressure piping systems under 15 psi might be exempt from all requirements, but that is not covered in this flowchart. Please contact the Manitoba Government for more details about the requirements of your piping system.


Piping- Ontario

Piping requirements for Ontario PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping- Ontario

Last Updated May 27 2014

Important: Ontario has strict limitations on which quality control programs are acceptable for piping. See the piping QC section below.

These Ontario piping flowcharts are copied directly from TSSA document SB00-7:

Flowchart of Piping process in Ontario Part 1

Flowchart of Piping process in Ontario Part 2

Flowchart of Piping process in Ontario Part 3

These flowcharts do not include the “TSSA requirements for medical gas piping. These charts have been modified with Code Adoption Document and refrigeration system comments by PVEng.


Piping – Quebec

Piping requirements for Quebec PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Quebec

Last updated Aug 2015, LRB/BEM

Update Aug 2015

Quebec pressure vessel legislation is currently being amended. The release date is not known. Many changes are being planned including:

Exemption of category A, B and C fittings from registration. Unlike BC and Saskatchewan, category G fittings are not being considered for exemption.

Fittings that have CSA or ULc certification will not require a CRN.

Alternate piping codes can be used as long as quality requirements can be validated (QC program with 3rd party audit,, conformity declaration, calculations, Available ASTM equivalent materials and records of testing)

Alternatives to CRN registration of used vessels built to ASME code standards are being developed.

Clarify with RBQ to determine if your skid or piping system needs registration. The flow chart below produces more conservative assessments then RBQ currently provides. In particular, some piping skid systems will be considered not “pressure equipment installs”.

Although this legislation is preliminary, it is currently being applied in a case by case basis. Contact RBQ for your project.

Original document last updated Sept 22, 2014

Piping registration requirements for Quebec ONLY: Registration of piping is done at the time the installer submits to the “Regie du batiment du Quebec” a declaration of installation of the piping. If the declaration of installation is accepted by the “Regie du batiment du Quebec”, a number is given to the installer and that number shall be used by the manufacturer of the piping as the provincial piping design registration number. [From Information Relating to Fees Applicable to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in the Province of Quebec * (A-20.01, r. 1.1), April 1, 2003, not available online]

Fittings used in piping systems shall be registered by the fitting manufacturer [fittings need a CRN].

Flowchart of Piping process in Quebec

This flowchart is based on information from the following 2 sources:

Quebec Government document titledREGULATION respecting pressure vessels subtitled – “An Act respecting pressure vessels” (chapter A-20.01, ss. 27 and 28) Updated Mar 1 2014 – refer to this current document as “REGULATION” and: An ACT respecting pressure vessels May 30, 2000.

DEFINITIONS 1. In this Regulation, unless otherwise indicated by the context,

“piping” means a system of pipes and conduits, including a manifold, used exclusively to carry a fluid from one point to another; (tuyauterie)

“low pressure” means (1) gauge pressure of 103 kPa [14.9 psi] or less for steam and gases; (2) gauge pressure of 1,100 kPa [159.5 psi] or less for water at a temperature of 121 degC [249.8degF] or less; or (3) vapour pressure of 205 kPa [29.7 psi] or less in absolute pressure for liquids at the maximum operating temperature; (basse pression)

DIVISION 2 SCOPE 2. The following pressure vessels are excluded from the Act and its regulations:

(7)low-pressure piping and fire fighting piping

Vapour pressure: Vapour pressure or equilibrium vapour pressure is defined as the pressure exerted by a vapour in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed phases at a given temperature in a closed system. [Wikipedia]. The vapour pressure of water at 100degC is 101.1kPa. If the pressure is raised to 204kPa, it will not boil until the temperature reaches 121degC. When the vapour pressure of a liquid is less than the pressure it is held at, boiling is prevented. The Quebec regulation asks: if a high pressure liquid other than water is lowered in pressure to 205kPa (absolute, or 104 kPa [15 psi] above atmospheric) at the maximum operating temperature, will the fluid boil? If so, register the piping system (or that part of the piping system). Note that a maximum operating temperature can be less than or equal to the design temperature.

Refrigeration is covered by section 3 and 3(4) of the act:

(3) Sections 14, 16 and 18 of the Act do not apply to the installation of the following vessels nor to an addition to or modification of their piping:

(3)(4) the components of a refrigeration plant whose total compressor motor power is 20 kW or less.

Confusion arises in referencing sections 14, 16 and 18. Per our conversations with RBQ, sections 14,16 and 18 of the outdated ACT are still referred to by the REGULATION. these sections must be taken from the 2000 ACT, not the current REGULATION:

(14) The installer of a pressure vessel must have its installation approved.

(16) No user of a pressure vessel may put it into operation unless its installation has been approved.

(18) A certificate of approval of installation shall be issued to the user of a pressure vessel when the requirements of sections 14 and, as the case may be, 17 have been complied with.

(17)The installer, repairer or user of a pressure vessel must obtain approval of a quality control program for it, in the cases determined by regulation.

Per these passages from the older REGULATION, Refrigeration plants less than 20kW are exempt in Quebec.


Piping- New Brunswick

Piping requirements for New Brunswick PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping- New Brunswick

Last updated Mar 28 2014 LRB

This is an extract of information collected from the following sources: NB Reg 84-174, NB Reg 84-175, NB Reg 84-176, >NB Reg 84-177

Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code

NB Reg 84-174, Last updated April 15 2011

101 This Regulation applies to boilers, pressure vessels, heat exchangers, air receivers, liquid receivers, oil refineries, refrigeration plants, power plants, steam processors or any other pressure vessel, fitting or piping.

110 All piping used in connection with boilers and pressure vessels shall meet the requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code or, where such requirements are not applicable, the requirements of the applicable ANSI standards prescribed in the Standards Regulation – Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act. [84-177]

“expansible fluid” means (a) any vapour or gaseous substance, or (b) any liquid under a pressure and at a temperature that is such that the liquid will change to a gas or vapour when the pressure is reduced to atmospheric pressure;

“fittings” means safety valves, stop valves, automatic stop-and-check valves, blow-down valves, reducing valves, water gauges, gauge cocks, pressure gauges, injectors, test cocks, fusible plugs, regulating and controlling devices and pipe fittings or any other apparatus or component attached to or forming part of any boiler, pressure vessel, plant or oil refinery;

“pressure piping system” means pipes, tubes, conduits, fittings, gaskets, bolting and other components making up a system, the sole purpose of which is the conveyance of an expansible fluid under pressure and the control of the flow of an expansible fluid under pressure between two or more points;

CHANGES REQUIRE REGISTRATION 310 (3) A change in material, thickness, diameter or design pressure shall constitute a new design.

Heating Plants and Power Plants Regulation

B Reg 84-175, Last updated April 15 2011

“high pressure heating plant” means a boiler or two or more boilers on the same premises having a safety valve setting of more than fifteen pounds per square inch (one hundred and three kilopascals) when the boiler is used for producing steam, or a safety valve setting of more than one hundred and sixty pounds per square inch (one thousand one hundred kilopascals) when the boiler is used for producing hot water or when the temperature of the hot water produced is in excess of two hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit (one hundred and twenty degrees Celsius);

“low pressure heating plant” means a boiler or two or more boilers on the same premises having a safety valve setting of not more than fifteen pounds per square inch (one hundred and three kilopascals) when the boiler is used for producing steam, or a safety valve setting of not more than one hundred and sixty pounds per square inch (one thousand one hundred kilopascals) when the boiler is used for producing hot water at a temperature of not more than two hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit (one hundred and twenty degrees Celsius);

“therm-hour” means one hundred thousand British Thermal Units per hour;(thermie/heure)

3 The Act does not apply to: (a) heating and power plants under the jurisdiction of the Canadian Transport Commission; (b) low pressure heating plants having a rating of fifty therm-hour or less; and (c) high pressure heating plants having a rating of twenty therm-hour or less.

Propane, Natural and Medical Gas Regulation

NB Reg 84-176, Last updated April 15 2011

“gas” means natural or propane gas;

“medical gas” means oxygen, nitrous oxide, medical air, medical vacuum, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, helium and any mixtures thereof;

3 This Regulation applies to (a) the manufacture, storage, transportation, handling, installing, testing and inspecting of gas and medical gas and of the associated appliances and equipment for the utilization of gas, (b) the maintenance of appliances and equipment for the utilization of gas, and (c) the installing, testing and inspecting of gas and medical gas piping systems.

6 Piping used in connection with this Regulation shall meet the requirements of the applicable ANSI standards and CSA standards prescribed in the Standards Regulation – Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act. [84-177]

7 The Chief Inspector may accept as approved (a) gas and medical gas appliances and equipment tested and listed by: (i) the Canadian Standards Association; (ii) the Canadian Gas Association; (iii) the Underwriters� Laboratories of Canada; (iv)Factory Mutual; or (v) a laboratory not listed in subparagraphs (i) to (iv) that is acceptable to the Chief Inspector; and (b) fittings tested and listed by the Underwriters� Laboratories Incorporated or any other laboratory acceptable to the Chief Inspector.

PROPANE AND NATURAL GAS PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS 20(1) Plans and specifications, in triplicate, of the design of gas systems that are independent of other mechanical systems and of the design of any alteration or addition thereto shall be submitted to the Chief Inspector to determine whether this Regulation has been complied with before any work commences on or any alteration or addition is made to (a) Repealed: (b) filling plants, (c)dispensing units, and (d) all gas installations having a total heating value of five million British Thermal Units or greater.

Standards Regulation

NB Reg 84-177, Last updated April 15 2011

2 The standards for the purposes of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code – Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act are those listed in Schedule A and include any standard, specification, code or other document referenced thereby.

SCHEDULE A 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) ASME B31.1-2010: Power Piping ASME B31.3-2010: Process Piping ASME B31.4-2009: Pipeline Transportation Systems for Liquid Hydrocarbons and Other Liquids ASME B31.8-2010: Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping Systems ASME B31.9-2011: Building Services Piping


Piping – Nova Scotia

Piping requirements for Nova Scotia PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Nova Scotia

Last updated Mar 27 2014 LRB

This is an extract of information collected from the following source: Boiler and Pressure Equipment Regulations O.I.C. 2011-27 (January 18, 2011, effective April 1, 2011), N.S. Reg. 10/2011

Definitions

“BPE standards” means the standards for boilers and pressure equipment established or adopted by the Minister in the Technical Safety Standards Regulations made under the Act;

“diameter”, in relation to a regulated product, means the inside diameter of a pressure boundary, unless otherwise stated in the BPE standards;

“expansible fluid” means either of the following: (i) a vapour or gaseous substance, (ii) a substance that is a liquid under its current pressure and temperature but that will change to a gas or vapour when the pressure is reduced to atmospheric pressure;

“gas” means any of the following: (i) natural gas, either before or after processing, (ii) a substance recovered from natural gas, crude oil, oil sands or coal for transmission in a gaseous state; (iii) a gaseous substance used to inject through a well into an underground formation;

“pressure piping system” means the pipes, tubes, conduits, fittings, gaskets, bolting and other components making up a system, the sole purpose of which is to convey an expansible fluid under pressure and control the flow of the expansible fluid;

“pressure plant” means a plant with an installation of a boiler, pressure vessel, refrigeration system or compressed gas system that is operated either alone or in combination as a unit by the same owner and management, whether the unit is portable or permanently attached to a solid base, and includes any compressor, piping, appliance or equipment attached [to] or used in connection with the plant;

“process plant” means a commercial or industrial facility where fluids, gases or solids are processed using pressure and temperature to help generate a manufactured regulated product;

Exemptions

Products exempted from Act and regulations 4 (1) All of the following products are exempt under subsection 6(2) of the Act from the Act and these regulations:

(j)a pressure piping system with any of the following types of piping or tubing:

(i)piping that is part of a system that is operating at a temperature of 121 degC (250 degF) or lower, and has (A) a steam service with [a] system safety or relief valve set at a pressure of 103 kPag (15 psig) or lower, or (B) a water service with [a] system safety or relief valve set at a pressure of 1103 kPag (160 psig) or lower,
(ii) piping or tubing with [a] system safety or relief valve set at a pressure of 690 kPag (100 psig) or lower and a temperature between -29 degC (-20 degF) and 121 degC (250 degF), and the system is used to deliver treated or non-treated domestic water, products for human consumption, glycols, or non-toxic and non-lethal substances that are considered chemically and environmentally benign,
(iii) air piping or tubing that has a system safety or relief valve set at a pressure of 1379 kPag (200 psig) or lower,
(iv) piping or tubing that is part of a breathing air system that is modularized, manufactured and has a certification mark of a recognized certification organization,
(v) piping or tubing used directly in (A) pneumatically or hydraulically controlled instruments, or (B) steam tracing,
(vi) refrigeration piping or tubing of a refrigeration system that has a maximum output capacity of 11 kW or less, or air conditioning used for human comfort,
(vii) piping or tubing used for the delivery of fuels directly into a combustion system and subject to the Fuel Safety Regulations made under the Act,
(viii) piping or tubing in a piping system used for fire suppression that is subject to the Fire Safety Act,
(ix) piping or tubing used to deliver medical and inert gases,
(x) threaded piping of nominal diameter 50 mm (DN50) or 60.33 mm in outside diameter (nominal pipe size 2 in. (NPS 2) or 2.375 in. in outside diameter) or less with a system safety or relief valve set at a pressure of 1034 kPag (150 psig) or lower if it either (A) meets the BPE standards, or (B) is a pressure piping system that meets the requirements of the industry standard for the particular pressure piping system as determined by the BPE chief inspector;


Piping – Prince Edward Island

Piping requirements for Prince Edward Island PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Prince Edward Island

Last updated Mar 27 2014 LRB

This flowchart is an approximate combination of information collected from the following source: http://www.gov.pe.ca

5.17 The following piping shall be considered pressure piping subject to all the requirements of these regulations:
(a) steam piping of any size or pressure over 15 PSI:
(b) water piping larger than 20 mm nominal pipe size to carry hot water at more than 207 kPa;
(c) piping to carry refrigerants, anhydrous ammonia, propane and similar gases;
(d) air or other inert gas piping larger than 20 mm nominal pipe size and at a pressure greater than 1750 kPa;
(e) oil piping larger than 20 mm nominal pipe size to carry hot oil at more than 207 kPa;
(f) piping systems used for the movement of non-flammable medical gases;
(g) any other piping used in connection with or as part of a boiler or pressure piping installation and classified as pressure piping by the Chief Inspector.

DESIGNS NOT REQUIRED TO BE REGISTERED

5.30 The following pressure plant designs are not required to be submitted for registration unless required by the Chief Inspector but shall otherwise comply with the regulations:
(a) power plants that do not exceed 600 kW;
(b) heating plants that do not exceed 1800 kW;
(c) refrigeration plants that do not exceed 60 kW; [updated to 74 kW]
(d) compressed air plants that do not exceed 200 kW;
(e) compressed air plants that are portable.

Flowchart of Piping process in PEI

At what temperature water becomes hot water or oil becomes hot oil is not defined


Newfoundland and Labrador

Piping requirements for Newfoundland and Labrador PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Newfoundland and Labrador

Flowchart of Piping process in

This flowchart is an approximate combination of information collected from the following source:

http://www.assembly.nl.ca/legislation/sr/regulations/rc969119.htm


Piping – Yukon

Piping requirements for Yukon PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Yukon

Flowchart of Piping process in the Yukon

This flowchart is an approximate combination of information collected from the following source:

Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act Regulations


Piping – North West Territories

Piping requirements for the North West Territories PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – North West Territories

“Pressure piping” means a pipe or tubing used for transmitting fluid to or from a pressure vessel; (conduite sous pression).
Use the Ontario chart:
Boilers & Pressure Vessels: Codes


Piping – North West Territories

Piping requirements for the North West Territories PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – North West Territories

“Pressure piping” means a pipe or tubing used for transmitting fluid to or from a pressure vessel; (conduite sous pression).
Use the Ontario chart:
Boilers & Pressure Vessels: Codes


Quality Control and Comments

Piping QC Requirements

Piping QC Requirements PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping QC Requirements

As with the scope of registration requirements above, QC requirements vary considerably from province to province. Items here are correct to the best of our knowledge as of August 2016.

ACI covers N.B., N.S., P.E.I., NFLD and Labrador, Yukon, N.W.T., and Nunavut.

“?” in the table indicates that we do not know at this time. (Our reference: PVE-4529).

* Ontario requires a CSA-B51 certificate of compliance from Ontario or another province that specifically includes pressure piping in the scope.  Other non B51 pressure piping QC programs can be accepted after a simplified review process – see SB02-02 Rev 2.  If the manufacturer already holds an third party audited QC program then an on site audit is likely not required.  The best matching programs are reviewed in 4 hours minimum at $170/hour.  Other programs that require more work cost more.  Contact Nicole Drvodelic at TSSA for more information. ndrvodelic@tssa.org

*** If you are going to do field work out of province, please contact the destination province in advance to make sure your QC program and welders certificates are acceptable. ***

To date piping systems do not have standardized stamping like vessels, so field inspectors can not tell if a system has been properly built and inspected without paperwork – the correct destination province’s piping certification paperwork – signed by an authorized inspector in the cases where it is required.  An easy way of doing this is including copies of this paperwork with the shipment.  The correct paperwork will provide the field inspector with the proof of registration (the piping registration number is on the forms) and proof of construction and inspection against a standard – again it is on the forms.  Once the fieldwork is properly completed, the field inspector can sign off and allow the system to be used.


Piping – Authors Comments

Authors comments on Canadian piping PRINT EXPAND SHRINK

Piping – Authors Comments

Canada does not have a Canadian Registration System. We have a collection of provincial systems. How is it possible that each province carefully studied what is required to keep the piping systems in their provinces safe and all came up with vastly different requirements? Alexis de Tocqueville (1805 to 1859) might have been thinking about piping registration:

After having thus successively taken each member of the community in its powerful grasp and fashioned him at will, the supreme power [of democracy] then extends its arm over the whole community. It covers the surface of society with a network of small complicate rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd. The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent and guided… men are seldom forced to act, but they are constantly restrained from acting… Such a power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize, but it compresses, enervate, extinguishes, and stupefies a people…

Thus the spirit is gradually broken…. gradually losing the faculties of thinking, feeling, and acting for themselves. [People then console themselves at the loss of their liberties] by reflection that they have chosen their own guardians.

The Canadian B51 standard has been around for 70 years. The piping registration is really only starting to happen now. It is mainly applied to new installations when an Authorized Inspector is expected to find it. Existing piping systems are seldom registered and usually ignored. We are only now, 70 years in, determining if this system is even possible. The tools to make it practical like searchable databases for registered parts are still being developed.

Laurence Brundrett
	Chairman, Pressure Vessel Engineering
	November 2012

Disclaimer:

While every effort is made to make these pages accurate and up to date as the CRN system changes, this information is only the opinion of Pressure Vessel Engineering Ltd. Please consider this an introduction – the first 20% of the information you require to navigate the CRN system.

Updated November 2012 – extensive re-write; Updated May 2013 – quick links added; Update in process May 2014 – revising decision flow charts and listing provincial legislation and other guides to determine the needs to register piping.  Aug 2016 – Clarified Ontario Piping QC requirements. Mar 2017 – accordion version.